Egg-Stuffed Avocado Olé makes a very special south-of-the-border breakfast or snack.

Egg-Stuffed Avocado Olé makes a very special south-of-the-border breakfast or snack.

So, here’s the thing: people LOVE avocado. Because avocado is delicious, healthy, and versatile. It’s possibly one of my favorite foods, I enjoy avocado very regularly, and it has that magical capability to elevate even the simplest meal to something very special:

I created this recipe for Egg-Stuffed Avocados Olé with (what I think is) some south-of-the-border flair as a festive Cinco de Mayo breakfast idea, and as a tribute to the precious treasure that is the avocado. Because with all of this avocado lovin’ going on, I wondered how this was impacting global avocado supply (because of course I did ) and there are some eco-conscious complications for everyone’s favorite creamy green toast topper.

Since I live in San Francisco, I’m intimately aware of the recent California drought, and I know it impacted California avocado production. Did you know it takes 74 gallons of water to grow a pound of avocados, as compared to a crop like tomatoes, which takes only 10 gallons per pound. The 2017 California avocado crop is estimated at approximately half the size as last year’s. Although some California avocado growers are experimenting with techniques such as high-density planting to make their production more efficient, it takes 2.6x the global average amount of water (28.4 gallons per pound of avocados) to grow the crop in California.

Stehly Farms Organics in San Diego County is using half as much water to yield twice as much fruit using a high-density planting technique developed by the University of California. (Credit: Whole Foods)
Stehly Farms Organics in San Diego County is using half as much water to yield twice as much fruit using a high-density planting technique developed by the University of California. (Image credit: Whole Foods)

Perhaps Mexican avocado production has ramped to meet soaring demand without too much damage to the environment? But a quick Google search reveals bad news: rising avocado prices are fueling illegal deforestation in Mexico, starting a cascade of environmental consequences. Could avocados become the next palm oil, resulting in mass deforestation, habitat loss, and release of damaging greenhouse gasses? Should we be treating them as a delicacy rather than an everyday food? According to Greenpeace Mexico:

The aggressive advance of the agricultural frontier at the expense of forests has been driven by the high demand and the high price of avocado at the national and international level. The contradiction between the public policies associated with the forestry sector and land use have weakened local government institutions and permit the fragmentation and privatization of common property forest land.

An avocado harvest is collected in Michoacán, the only Mexican state authorized to export the fruit to the United States. A mature avocado orchard uses almost twice as much water as fairly dense forest, meaning less water reaches Michoacán's legendary crystalline mountain streams on which trees and animals in the forests depend. (Credit: Naples Herald)
An avocado harvest is collected in Michoacán, the only Mexican state authorized to export the fruit to the United States. A mature avocado orchard uses almost twice as much water as fairly dense forest, meaning less water reaches Michoacán’s legendary crystalline mountain streams on which trees and animals in the forests depend. (Image credit: Naples Herald)
As conscious consumers, we play a part in what happens to our planet daily via our food choices.Click To Tweet

As conscious consumers, we play a part in what happens to our little green gem of a planet daily through our food choices. There are no easy answers here, especially where avocado is concerned. So let’s treasure them, friends. Eat avocados as a treat, and in celebration, but understand that they have an impact on our environment, whether grown locally or in other countries.

Egg-Stuffed Avocado Olé is eggs baked in an avocado and topped with salsa, queso fresco, cilantro, red chili flakes, jalapeño... even a dash of lime!

I hope you enjoy this Egg-Stuffed Avocado Olé recipe for Cinco de Mayo or any other extra-special breakfast.

Shout-out to The Healthy Foodie and her method for baking eggs in avocados without over-cooking the yolks! I used a modified version of the technique for this recipe and cooked the egg-stuffed avocados in a small but mighty toaster oven instead of on the stovetop as The Healthy Foodie recommends or in a full-size oven. 

Egg-Stuffed Avocado Olé

Prep Time 0:05 2017-05-26T00:05:00+00:00
Cook Time 0:25 2017-05-26T00:25:00+00:00
Total Time 0:30 2017-05-26T00:30:00+00:00
Serves 1     adjust servings

Ingredients

  • 1 avocado
  • 2 eggs
  • 2 spoonfuls of salsa
  • 1 small jalapeño, sliced
  • Sprinkle of queso fresco
  • Red chili flakes
  • Cilantro
  • Salt and black pepper, to taste

Instructions

  1. Preheat the oven to 425° F. Slice the avocado in half, compost the pit. Scoop out a bit of the avocado to make a larger and deeper cavity (to hold the eggs).
  2. Crack an egg over a measuring cup with a spout or something similar. Cradle the egg yolk gently in one-half of the egg shell, while letting the egg whites drain down into the measuring cup. The goal is to separate the egg whites from the yolk, it may be necessary to gently disconnect some of the egg whites from the yolk with your fingers. Gently tip the yolk, being careful not to break it, into a shot glass or other very small cup. Repeat the process of separating the yolk from the whites with a second egg, combining the whites but keeping the two yolks apart.
  3. Gently whisk the egg whites, to break them up, then carefully divide them between the two avocado halves. Depending on the side of your eggs and avocados, you may have too much egg whites for your avocado halves. If the avocados are almost filled and you have excess egg whites, set them aside for another use (do not over-fill the avocados).
  4. Place the avocado halves on a baking sheet, making sure they're level. It may be necessary to insert some folded parchment paper or other oven-safe material under the tips of the avocado halves to level them. Bake in the preheated oven for approximately 20 minutes until the whites are firm.
  5. Remove the avocado halves from the oven and gently tip one yolk onto each of them (use a spoon to steady the yolk on the surface of the avocado and position it, if necessary). Return the avocado halves to the oven for an additional 5 minutes, maximum, to cook the yolks slightly while still keeping them runny.
  6. Transfer the avocado to a plate, and top with salsa, queso fresco, cilantro, red chili flakes, jalapeno, and salt and pepper. Serve warm.

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Nutrition Facts
Serving Size
Amount Per Serving As Served
Calories 450kcal Calories from fat 339
% Daily Value
Total Fat 38g 58%
Saturated Fat 7g 35%
Transfat 0g
Cholesterol 320mg 107%
Sodium 694mg 29%
Carbohydrate 19g 6%
Dietary Fiber 14g 56%
Sugars 2g
Protein 15g

Percent Daily Values are based on a 2,000 calorie diet. Your daily values may be higher or lower depending on your calorie needs:

Calories 2000 2500
Total Fat Less than 65g 80g
Sat Fat Less than 25g 80g
Cholesterol Less than 300mg 300mg
Sodium Less than 2,400mg 2,400mg
Total Carbohydrate 300g 375g
Dietary Fiber 25g 30g
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